Important News & Updates


Be Aware of the Latest Craigslist Check Fraud Scam

A check fraud scam involving a large number of checks was recently reported by Pima Federal Credit Union in Tucson, Arizona. The details show this fraud scam has a broader reach than others that have occurred recently. Fraudsters are targeting individuals selling items on Craigslist and individuals applying for jobs online (e.g. “secret shopper” job, babysitting jobs on Care.com, or similar sites). These scams are known in the industry as the “overpayment scam.” The secret shopper scammers have primarily sent a 2-day or 3-day Priority Letter, through the United States Post Office, delivered to consumers across the country. In the envelope, consumers receive fraudulent cashier’s checks allegedly from Pima Federal Credit Union – typically blue, marbled in appearance (example shown); however, other variations are also circulating. The checks are written for amounts generally between $180 and $22,000. The most common amounts are between $1,200 and $4,000. Accompanying the fraudulent checks are instructions -- either by a letter or by text -- to deposit funds, keep a portion, and send the remaining balance to prescribed individuals.
The Craigslist scam involves texting to confirm the “payment” was received, and instructions on wiring excess funds back. Several other scams involve babysitting or housekeeping services, with texting also as the primary communication method. Payment is made with a fraudulent cashier’s check. If the consumer follows instructions, they become victims when the fraudulent cashier’s checks are returned as altered / fictitious. Consumers are asked to call 520.887.5010 and provide details to Pima Federal’s e-Services group to assist in the investigation.

Scammers Calling Consumers Claiming to be NCUA and Asking for Personal Information

 

The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) has issued a warning about a telephone scam in which consumers are contacted by a caller claiming to work for NCUA and asking for personal and financial information. According to the agency, the caller tells the consumer her or his credit card or debit card has been frozen or blocked. The caller then asks for the consumer’s Social Security number, account number, date of birth and home address to supposedly verify the information. NCUA is reminding consumers that they should not provide this or any other information to the caller.

NCUA Warns Consumers about "Spoofing" Scam that Mimics Agency's Telephone Number


The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) is alerting consumers that text messages they receive from an agency telephone line - 703-518-6301 - asking for personal information are not coming from the NCUA. NCUA does not request personal or financial information from consumers. This attempted fraud is called "spoofing". The perpetrators are able to mimic a telephone number to generate text messages. The texts may warn of a debit card reaching its limit or use some other trick to persuade individuals to provide personal information or go to a malicious website. Please do not click on links in the message if you receive it, nor should you provide information to any websites referenced in the message, or attempt to conduct any financial transactions through those websites.

NCUA Warns Consumers about "Spoofing" Scam that Mimics Agency's Telephone Number


The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) is alerting consumers that text messages they receive from an agency telephone line - 703-518-6301 - asking for personal information are not coming from the NCUA. NCUA does not request personal or financial information from consumers. This attempted fraud is called "spoofing". The perpetrators are able to mimic a telephone number to generate text messages. The texts may warn of a debit card reaching its limit or use some other trick to persuade individuals to provide personal information or go to a malicious website. Please do not click on links in the message if you receive it, nor should you provide information to any websites referenced in the message, or attempt to conduct any financial transactions through those websites.

NCUA Warns Consumers about "National Credit Union" Phishing Scam


The National Credit Union Administration has received reports of an online phishing scam that uses a website with a logo and a design similar to the agency’s own site in an attempt to convince unwary customers to provide information or send money.

Consumers have received emails from the National Credit Union website, which apparently originates in Australia and claims to offer services in the United States, Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States. This website is not affiliated in any way with the National Credit Union Administration, a federal agency, and the emails are not from NCUA.

The emails attempt to persuade individuals to provide personal information, such as Social Security numbers, account numbers and login information, or transfer large amounts of money. Consumers should neither provide information to this website nor attempt to conduct any financial transactions through it. NCUA would not request personal or financial information in this manner. See NCUA’s Privacy Policy for more information.

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